Teaching & Research

Philosophy of Teaching  (PDF document)

Teaching Experience

Adjunct Professor – Masters:

Public Libraries (Spring 2017)

Assessing and Improving Your Library’s Social Media Presence (Summer 2017)

Public Libraries (Spring 2016)

Adjunct Professor – Undergraduate:

Social Media Management (Summer 2016)

Lead Instructor – Undergraduate:

Introduction to Information Science (Fall 2015)

Introduction to Information Science (Spring 2016)

Teaching Assistant – Masters:

School Collection Development (Fall 2012)

Information Needs of Young Adults (Fall 2012)

Storytelling (Summer 2013)

Teaching Assistant – Undergraduate:

Social Media Management (Summer 2014)

Societal Implications of the Information Age (Summer 2014)

Introduction to Information Science (Spring 2014)

Introduction to Health Consumer Informatics (Spring 2014)

Information and Society  (Spring 2013)

Information and Society  (Fall 2013)

Introduction to Information Science (Fall 2013)

 

 

Guest Lecturer:

Technology for Information Professionals, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Spring 2014)

Perspectives on Information Technology, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Spring 2014)

Perspectives on Information Technology, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Summer 2014)

Perspectives on Information Technology, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Summer 2014)

Information Needs of Young Adults, Graduate Course, School of Information, Florida State University (Fall 2014)

IT Project Management, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Fall 2014)

Perspectives on Information Technology, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Fall 2014)

Information Ethics for the 21st Century, Undergraduate honors course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Spring 2015)

Perspectives on Information Technology, Undergraduate course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Spring 2015)

Information Needs of Young Adults, Graduate Course, School of Information, Florida State University (Fall 2015)

Assessing Information Needs, Graduate course, School of Information, Florida State University, (Fall 2015)

Information Ethics for the 21st Century, Undergraduate level course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Spring 2016)

Perspectives on Information Technology, Undergraduate level course, College of Communication and Information, Florida State University (Spring 2016)

Philosophy of Research (PDF document)

Current Research Projects / Works in Progress

Understanding Empathy in the Profession: A Comparative Study of American Museum Professionals and American Librarians

While often unacknowledged, empathy is an important component of everyday library work. When engaging with the public, librarians’ express empathy and compassion. This is particularly apparent when working with underserved and youth populations, as well as promoting social justice and advocacy. Like libraries, museum professional engage with the public frequently during the course of a workday. Yet little is known about how museums professional employ empathy during these interaction, if at all. In this collaborative study, my colleague, Dr. Laura-Edythe Coleman and I, are investigating how empathy is displayed and understood by museum and library professionals. Through the findings of surveys and semi-structure interviews of these professionals, we will explore the ways in which empathy can be better engaged within the library and museum setting.

Cyberbullying and Patrons with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

In an increasingly digital world, cyberbullying is becoming an everyday problem for many youth. Whether at home or school, children and young adults frequently encounter cyberbullying and similar forms of harassment while interacting online. Librarians are in a unique position to assist cyberbullied youth. Often seem as non-authoritative, librarians have the ability to interact with cyberbullied young adults in ways other adults may not. Through the library space, librarians can provide tailored programming, empathy, and engagement to a population who may not have other options.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at particular risk for cyberbullying, as they often have difficulty understanding social norms and communication patterns. These differences in understanding communication can make these individuals targets for bullying behaviors. More individuals with ASD are finding themselves online than ever before, as there is a growing community online of self advocacy organizations for those with ASD, and also because communication online can avoid some of the challenges that people with ASD face in making eye contact and face-to-face communication. While potentially allowing for reduced frustration in face-to-face communication, online communication leaves those with ASD at risk for perhaps an even greater concern – being targeted by cyberbullies.

Through qualitative methods, my colleague Amelia Anderson and I are investigating how librarians can better prepare individuals with ASD to navigate communications in the online environment – both to avoid cyberbullies and to appropriately address conflict when cyberbullying occurs.

Digital Citizenship and Digital Literacy as Means of Preventing Cyberbullying Among Young Adults

Information ethics is deeply rooted in the issue of cyberbullying. At the core of cyberbullying are unethical online behaviors and the poor online relationships of youth. However, this is one area where librarians and LIS researchers can help. This paper will introduce digital citizenship and digital literacy as possible avenues for preventing cyberbullying from occurring among young adults. Additionally, the paper will discuss the importance of including digital citizenship and digital literacy in LIS curriculum. Digital citizenship is critical for the prevention of cyberbullying. Through training on digital citizenship and digital literacy, librarians can educate young patrons on ethical, safe, and responsible online activities. Along with instructing future librarians in the basics of digital literacy and online behaviors, LIS educators must incorporate digital citizenship into relevant coursework. Librarians can use this information and training to develop programming, workshops, and training sessions for at-risk youth once employed in libraries.

Let’s Facebook It: Promoting Library Services to Young Adults Through Social Media

In this exploratory mixed-method study, I investigate how librarians use social media to engage with young adult patrons and what roles these librarians perceive social media as having for promoting library services. Additionally, the professional roles and responsibilities young adult librarians perceive themselves portraying to young adult patrons through their library’s social media presence are examined. I am currently fine-tuning a paper for publication that focuses on the findings culled from first part of the study (an online survey). I hope to write another paper looking at findings from the second part of this study (in-depth interviews) early next year.

The Empathetic Librarian: Rural Librarians as a Source of Support for Rural Cyberbullied Young Adults

Librarians have the potential to support cyberbullied young adults in conjunction with parents, teachers, and other adults in the community. Through day-to-day interactions with young patrons, librarians can offer guidance through programming, reader’s advisory, and empathetic services. This exploratory research draws attention to the perspectives of both young adults and librarians regarding librarianship, cyberbullying, and support for cyberbullied young adults.

Research focusing on the perspectives, experiences, and reflections of young adults can help remove the invisibility of cyberbullying and reveal possibilities for supporting victims. Using video autoethnographies and interviews of rural young adults and librarians, this dissertation will highlight the types of support cyberbullied young adults need and the ways in which school and public librarians can provide this support.

I defended my dissertation on Monday, February 8, 2016. Hooray! I am in the beginning stages of turning my work into several (please!) journal articles.

 

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